I didn’t get the job, what now?

Recently I received my first “no” for a job I really, really wanted. I found out about this job a couple months before the career fair in March when I was looking for internships. When I saw it, I knew it was perfect. It’s located in a great city, the recruiter I met with at the career fair was enthusiastic and cute (totally unrelated, but it doesn’t hurt to have cute co-workers as a single woman), and the happy hour gathering they had the next day was promising. Plus, it was a start-up company so I had more hope as they usually have multiple positions open for semi-experienced college graduates.

So I applied to two similar positions within the company and hoped for the best, crossed my fingers, wished on a star – the whole nine yards. After two weeks, I received an e-mail from the hiring manager and my eyes immediately skimmed until they landed on “We regret to inform you.” I blinked back a couple of tears and then opened a new tab in my browser to look for another job. Because, that’s what you do – when you don’t get the job, you keep looking. The process of job hunting is tough. The employment numbers for college students are bleak – 18% unemployment and 53% underemployment per NACE. If you aren’t earning a degree that basically offers job placement as an incentive (think accounting MPA), you’re on your own.

This may not seem all that positive, but here’s a little well known secret. Job-hunting is hard. So if you’ve done all you can degree wise, had some internships, updated your LinkedIn profile, wore the right interview clothes, and deleted all of your drunken photos on social networking sites from college parties, then keep looking as persistence pays off.

Remember:

  • J.K Rowling’s agent tried for a year to get the first Harry Potter book published as it was rejected by 12 publishers.
  • Walt Disney was fired from the Kansas City Star newspaper because, his editor said, he “lacked imagination and had no good ideas.”
    • Steven Spielberg was rejected from the University of Southern California School of Theater, Film and Television three times and finally applied to and was accepted by another college.
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