Products Students Need For Career Fairs

 

The key to success in the job search process is preparation! These are a few things that are always good to have on hand:

Business cards

  • Vistaprint
  • Moo
  • Check with your University to see if they offer them

Personalized Stationery

Portfolio

Select something plain and elegant, ideally leather with a notepad for taking notes, and a section to hold resumes and business cards.

Here are examples currently available on Amazon:

 

Summer is Over, Now What?

What did you do this summer?

Did you Intern? Volunteer? Take a class? Travel? Work a summer job? Study Abroad? Lead at a camp? If you did any one of these or other activities, be sure to add details to your resume and LinkedIn profile. Focus on the ‘Why’ and try to quantify what you did and the impact you made.

After Labor Day, it will be time for the Fall Career Fair, on-campus recruiting sessions, informational interviews, and the list goes on. The sooner you are prepared with an updated resume the better!

Here are some tips to help guide you:

Resume:

  • Add Internships and jobs to your “Professional Experience” Section

  • If you were a Counselor, add summer camps to your work experience

  • Add Study Abroad to your Education Section

  • Add any skills or languages you learned, or any new hobbies/interests to the bottom of your resume.

Updating your LinkedIn:

  • Copy/paste the following from your resume so they match (company name, job title, and dates)
    • Experience:  Each work experience should be entered separately
    • Education: Same as resume
  • Add Volunteer Experience and relevant causes
  • Skills – add all identified on your resume, putting technical/ computer applications first, then business skills
  • Accomplishments
  • Add Courses: Either every class or relevant classes to your major (your preference)
  • Organizations

Are YOU Ready for the Career Fair?

 

Career Fairs can be overwhelming but with adequate preparation, any student can succeed. Here are some guidelines to help you through the process:

What do I bring?

  • A plan of what companies you want to talk to, including practice companies and research on each target company
  • Portfolio (Simple black one with a pad of paper on one side and a pocket on the other side)
  • Pen
  • Plenty of Resumes (Based on how many companies you want to talk to X2)
  • Business Cards (Click here for help)
  • Proper Attire
  • Mints in your pocket
  • A watch (to plan your time strategically without having to look at your phone, if you use your phone make sure it is on silent)
  • A Pitch

 

Tips

  • Look on your university website to identify your Career Fairs date and time, dress code, and list of companies attending
  • Pick a couple of practice companies to talk to first in order to help you get warmed up
  • Don’t walk away from any table without the first and last name of the person you talked to
  • Before you talk to the next person, take some notes on the conversation you just had so that you can reference it later for your thank you note

 

The Pitch

A quick summary of who you are and what you are looking for

 

Intro: Offer your name, a firm handshake, and give them a resume

Objective: Why you’re there and what type of job you’re looking for, and where

Summary: Briefly summarize education, experience, and interests

Closing: Reiterate your interest, thank the employer (get a business card if possible)

 

Example:

Hi, I’m [NAME], I’m a [junior MIS] major, graduating in [May 2018], looking for an [MIS internship this summer].

Really enjoy —–

I’m very interested in (company) and look forward to hearing from you.  Thanks for talking with me.

Misplaced obsession: Getting our kids in the best college, what about the best job?

I’ve always been mystified by the amount of time, money, and effort parents spend   between K-12th grade on sports, fine art lessons, tutoring, camps, travel and education with a clear goal in mind. These experiences will ultimately get my child in the “best” college. Once on campus, little to no money is spent helping this same emerging adult acquire unique skills and experiences to acquire their “best” job upon college graduation. To be clear, my definition of “best” is best fit for each individual.

To be clear, these childhood activities provided a sense of belonging, learning, achievement and joy – all things we should want for our children in a work environment. The process used to select these activities and our child’s engagement with them, as it relates to exploration, research, experimentation, learning and refinement can be successfully applied to career planning.

There are many career assessments that can be used to gain insights and are valuable, yet in the end, every individual is motivated and fulfilled by a unique set of personal preferences that vary in importance. Discussing and prioritizing these preferences and then applying them to the career planning process is a proven method for students to not only determine what they want, but get the job they want!

Let’s make the time and investment in career planning with our college kids, as everyone deserves to work for a company they can identify with and respect and spend time on activities they enjoy.

5 Skills You Can Build This Summer, That Employers Actually Want!

Summer is a great time to learn something new.  We’ve done the heavy lifting and curated great sites to help you get started.

Some of these are free, others are cheap, and a few are pricey, yet intensive and highly respected.

Udemy                   lynda.com                   Codeacademy

Cousera                   Skillshare                    Khan Academy

TED-Ed                    Squareknot                       DataCamp

DataMonkey           General Assembly        LinkedIn Learning

With so many resources it can be hard to know where to start! Acquiring these 5 skills will help you stand out with employers.

  1. Project Management

The Project Management Institute (PMI) predicts that between 2010 and 2020, 15.7 million project-management positions will be created globally. They also report that an applicant with a Project Management Professional (PMP) certification can earn and extra 16% more than those without it. Not ready to commit to a certification program, check out Trello or MS Project online videos to learn these project management tools.

  1. Excel

This isn’t just about making pretty spreadsheets, employers want to know that you can take it to the next level by manipulating and analyzing data. Pivot tables, VBA, and Array Functions are a few examples of how you can make data work for you. Even if data analytics isn’t the kind of career you’re looking for, being able to expertly use Excel makes you valuable to any team.

  1. Social Media Marketing

Social media is about more than retweeting your favorite celebs on Twitter and trolling Facebook for memes. Employers are looking for people with Search Engine Optimization skills because promoting a brand through a social network requires strategy. If you’re well-versed with social media platforms, include it among your skills on your résumé. These are increasingly important, especially if you’re planning to work in marketing, online publishing or public relations. Developing your own strong following on these platforms can affirm your skills to employers too. If SEO is a new acronym, take an online course and you will stand out. If you have a summer internship, volunteer to create content for their social media channels too.

  1. Writing

Nearly every job description requires “strong communication skills.” As a result, everyone claims to have these skills. Given this high employer need, the best way to demonstrate this skills is to show it by including links to publications or blog posts. If you don’t have public posts you can reference, take an online writing course, or two, then ask your employer if you can create some content, start your own blog, or write for a student publications at your university.

  1. Programming Languages

Since everything has moved online, demand for programmers and web developers has never been higher.  Even if you’re not technical, HTML, SQL, and Java can help you stand out.

 

Interview Accessories that Build Confidence

Now that we’re working with our 4th college graduation class, we realized it helps to have a checklist for interviews to insure you will have everything you need to be successful at Career Fairs, campus, and on-site interviews.

Here’s what we recommend:

  • Portfolio (black or brown, ideally leather, that includes pad of paper, pen and a place to store extra resumes and business cards
  • Business cards – we suggest students check their career center first as some universities offer this service. If not, head to vistaprint.com (cheapest) or www.moo.com (more options). Better for sales, tech, and advertising so you can make a unique impression.
  • Extra resumes – always have 5-10 on hand, more for a career fair
  • Mints
  • Healthy snack bar – in case there was no time for lunch
  • Appropriate attire – check career center guidelines or confirm with employer’s HR contacts regarding expected attire for interviews and events

If you want to learn more about the content for business cards, please read our blog post: How to Create a Student Business Card

The Job Search Process – Where Do I Start?

A blank piece of paper can be inspiring or intimidating, a clean slate or a lack of ideas. The start of the job search process looks like a big white space to most college students and new college grads.

Before you “do something” which typically means applying to a myriad of jobs you know little or care nothing about, I encourage you to honestly evaluate and rank your personal priorities first so you can use this list as a roadmap to direct your search.

Think about and rank the importance of these factors relative to one another so you can see what’s important to you (not your roommate, sibling, or parents)

  • Money – salary range for the jobs/areas of interest
  • Geographic location – specify where you want to live
  • Mission and Value – the importance your values align with the company
  • Company – a list of companies you admire and would move anywhere for
  • Job role – you are driven by what you do every day in terms activities
  • Industry – you have an aversion or a passion for a specific industry
  • Company culture – physical location and team environment
  • Company size – start-up, mid size or Fortune 500

Once this exercise is complete, you will have learned a lot about yourself. Plus, these findings can drive your next steps.

 

The Value of Volunteering Off-Campus

Many college students spend a significant amount of time trying to fit in. When it comes to the job search process, the goal is the opposite. How do I stand out from the crowd?

One of the easiest and most meaningful ways is to determine where you volunteer your time and what skills you build or apply to the organization. The opportunity to contribute to an organization you truly care about is available in almost any college town.

Instead of dedicating all your time to campus organizations, explore music or art non-profits if this is your personal or professional area of interest. Volunteer to apply your marketing or fundraising skills to a pet shelter or food bank or improve your foreign language skills teaching computer classes at a local refugee center.

Your passion will shine through in your interviews and your authentic stories will be different and memorable to recruiters. Be different, step off campus and lend your valuable skills to a well –deserving non-profit. I’m sure you will reap more benefits than they do.

 

Are You Considering Growth when Choosing a Career Path?

Not since the Industrial Revolution has there been so much disruption in the global labor market. The share economy (uber, Airbnb…) didn’t exist 10 years ago. Driverless vehicles, consumer space flight, and new artificial intelligence and virtual reality applications will forever change careers in many diverse industries including law and medicine.

Historically, the top earning potential for women has peaked at 39, 48 years old for men. In this time of massive disruption, it’s important to target roles and industries that are forecasted to grow so you are not forced re-invent yourself due to a lack of job growth or job loss in your highest financial performing years.

Check out these 10 career fields that are forecasted to grow:

http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2012/09/10/10-businesses-that-will-boom-in-2020