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Are YOU Ready for the Career Fair?

 

Career Fairs can be overwhelming but with adequate preparation, any student can succeed. Here are some guidelines to help you through the process:

What do I bring?

  • A plan of what companies you want to talk to, including practice companies and research on each target company
  • Portfolio (Simple black one with a pad of paper on one side and a pocket on the other side)
  • Pen
  • Plenty of Resumes (Based on how many companies you want to talk to X2)
  • Business Cards (Click here for help)
  • Proper Attire
  • Mints in your pocket
  • A watch (to plan your time strategically without having to look at your phone, if you use your phone make sure it is on silent)
  • A Pitch

 

Tips

  • Look on your university website to identify your Career Fairs date and time, dress code, and list of companies attending
  • Pick a couple of practice companies to talk to first in order to help you get warmed up
  • Don’t walk away from any table without the first and last name of the person you talked to
  • Before you talk to the next person, take some notes on the conversation you just had so that you can reference it later for your thank you note

 

The Pitch

A quick summary of who you are and what you are looking for

 

Intro: Offer your name, a firm handshake, and give them a resume

Objective: Why you’re there and what type of job you’re looking for, and where

Summary: Briefly summarize education, experience, and interests

Closing: Reiterate your interest, thank the employer (get a business card if possible)

 

Example:

Hi, I’m [NAME], I’m a [junior MIS] major, graduating in [May 2018], looking for an [MIS internship this summer].

Really enjoy —–

I’m very interested in (company) and look forward to hearing from you.  Thanks for talking with me.

The Concept of Mattering – Why It’s Important to College Students

Working with college students and new grads daily running Career Onward, a personalized career advisory company, we knew that mental health and support play significant roles in the transition outcomes from college to a career. Yet, we also understood there was more to it – we had more to learn.

I wasn’t familiar with the concept of Mattering until listening to an interview by Mattering expert Gregory Elliott, Pd.D., Professor of Sociology at Brown University. Listen to the full interview here. (https://motivislearning.com/insights/gregory-elliott-interview/. We now realize that Mattering is a key component to this successful college to career transition.

 

Excerpts from the Interview with Gregory Elliot, Ph.D.

What is Mattering?

Mattering is the understanding that, in any of a variety of ways, you make a difference in the world around you. It’s kind of like the obverse notion of significant other. So if a significant other is someone who makes a difference in your life, the question of mattering is whether you make a difference in anybody else’s life.

3 Types of Mattering

There are three different kinds of mattering, all of which are important. The first one is very basic, very fundamental, and I call it awareness. It is basically the question of whether you can capture other people’s attention. So when you walk into a room, do people at least look up and notice that you’ve come in? If you say something, do people acknowledge that they heard it? Can people put a name to your face? It’s a basic notion that I am not socially invisible.

Then there are two other kinds of mattering that are more relationship-oriented. The first one is called importance. With importance, it’s a matter of; do you recognize that people invest in your welfare? So for example, if something really good happens to you, does anyone else care? Or on the other side, if you have a really bad day, is there someone you can lean on because they’ll take the time to be with you? The question is whether people will take some of their precious resources, including time, and spend it on you because they want to improve your welfare.

The last one is the kind of reverse of importance and I call it reliance. That is, do people come to you with their wants and needs? Do people ask your advice about any problem that they might be having? Do people want your opinion on social and political issues? Do people turn to you when they’re having a bad time?

 

Improving College to Career Outcomes

Since parents still play the largest role in the college to career transition, I hope through education, parents can better understand Mattering as it relates to their son or daughter. Better yet, my wish is that every college student would understand the three different kinds of Mattering and support their friends and fellow students during one of the most difficult life transitions they will make.

As we know, it takes much more than strong academics and robust skills for student to acquire “right fit” jobs and companies.  Mattering matters.

3 Great Skills To Build This Summer!

Summer is the perfect time to work on skills that will help to fulfill your career goals. Below we have highlighted three areas that you can easily brush up on during the downtime of summer. We even included free resources to help you get started. Good luck!

  1. Network!

Talk to your neighbor who has a cool job. Strike up a conversation with a stranger in an elevator. Ask your parents if you can tag along to work. You never know where a conversation or connection can lead you. It might result in your next big break!

Want to craft a 30 second intro for opportunities like this? Learn how here. Learning your 30-second intro is very important, but remember, you’re not a robot! Make it personal too, and don’t just talk about yourself. Always remember to ask questions!

  1. Excel. Learn it. Love it. Live it.

You’re probably tired of hearing people tell you this, but Excel really is as important as everyone says it is! I don’t just mean learning how to put formulas into excel, but really understanding every function, and being able to make a presentation in any format. Take your summer to develop and refine those excel skills. The best part, it is totally free! http://chandoo.org

  1. Improve Your Public Speaking Skills

Hard skills are important, but learning how to speak in public is essential for long-term success! Whether it is winning over a recruiter in an interview, or pitching an idea that could win over the president of your company, you need to be able to speak in public. Here is a quick, painless, and free way to touch up on those speaking skills.